Cling Film??

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    alexiaonfire said on October 1, 2008

    Hi I was just wondering, my tattoo artist said that cling film is a bad idea and she was not allowed to use it in her studio anymore, but I have a friend that does tattoos and he swears its better for them..

    ..is it a good idea or not?

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    sharptattoos said on October 1, 2008

    Heat, lack of air, moisture and body fluids = perfect breeding ground for bacteria.

    Cling film and saran wrap are for food, not tattoos.

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    tonyy said on October 3, 2008

    Studio i went to do cling film and say keep it cling filmed up for 4 days

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    tonyy said on October 3, 2008

    Yes, they say keep it for 4 days and change it like 3-4 times a day putin bepanthen on. Its well known studio with good artists so it musnt be that bad.

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    swedishsweetie said on October 4, 2008

    It worked for me, used it for about 4 days after i got inked.

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    luke2269 said on October 11, 2008

    all my tats have been cling wraped and i take it off after an hour when i go home to wash it then leave it uncovered, and just put the easytattoo repair cream on 4 times a day.

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    ronnie1979 said on October 12, 2008

    i keep a paper towel on mine ( kitchen roll ) for the first hour then take it off and wash it with warm soapy water and apply a tattoo aftercare product ( many on the market ) just keeping it well fed.

    im sure that no good tattoo shop would give bad advise tho

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    ditzygrrl1 said on October 20, 2008

    Most artists here seem to use cling film ... but it's really just to keep the dirt off it till you get home and can wash it. I wouldn't keep it on for days tho.. great breeding ground for bacteria like sharp said.
    At my shop we use paper towel... leave it on for an hour.. basically to get u home to wash it properly. Pat it dry with a clean towel and let the moisture dry out of it before you put on a very small amount of 'Protat' or 'Bepanthan' 2-3 times a day.
    I've been getting ink for 20 years and Bepanthan has never failed me.. I still use a little every now and then and my colour is still super bright.

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    mikey0086 said on October 24, 2008

    Safety Advisory - The Use of Plastic Wrap on Fresh Tattoos
    From Peggy Sucher - Skin Deep Tattoo Waikiki

    The use of plastic wrap to cover fresh tattoos may have gotten it’s start at biker events. I can remember first seeing it used in the ‘70’s and ‘80’s. Newly tattooed people were peeling off their bandages to show their bro’s their new ink and untrained tattooers came up with the ‘see through’ idea of plastic wrap. No need to peel that bandage back anymore. Blood wasn’t much of an issue in those days. Unfortunately some of our uneducated brethren have failed to see the dangers today and have continued this error-filled practice.
    What's the Problem?
    The problem is that plastic wrap creates an occlusive seal meaning that no air gets in and no air gets out. This keeps all of the body fluids pooling on the skin surface. That surface builds up body temperatures to nearly 103 degrees which is a perfect breeding ground for bacteria. Your new tattoo has just been turned into a petri-dish for bacterial growth. Nice, huh?

    That pooling of body fluids--all liquids must go somewhere and that is to the bottom of the plastic wrap. Body fluids leak out and run down the body where people will brush against other people or surfaces thus creating a multi-contaminated field. And putting a piece of paper towel at the bottom does nothing to stop the oozing and temperature buildup.

    Care to Rub on Someone's Body Fluids?
    I recently visited a neighboring studio and witnessed a plastic wrapped client sitting in their waiting room with body fluids running down his arm into the fabric sofa. Talk about a contaminated field! Ugh! If such an unfortunate individual enters our studio we ask them politely to leave, as we don’t want their body fluids on our chairs, racks, counters or floors. I also give them a copy of this article to take back to the tattooers who obviously aren’t educated in blood borne pathogens.

    It's Not Only Gross, It May be Illegal
    Most state tattoo regulations such as ours here in Hawaii specifically state the appropriate type of dressing to use. Hawaii Department of Health Regulation 11-17-10-H “the entire area covered with a piece of sterile dressing and secured with proper adhesive”. It’s even one of the questions on our tattoo licensing test!

    Not only is the use of plastic wrap illegal in most regulated states but it is a cheap insult to a client who deserves a better start with their new tattoo. What price is proper bandaging? How do you put a dollar sign on contamination prevention?

    Use of plastic wrap is forbidden in many quality tattoo conventions. National Tattoo Association and the Alliance of Professional Tattooists have outlawed its use in their shows. It’s time that all convention promoters educate themselves and make this ban an industry-wide policy.

    Protect Yourself
    Before you, as a client, get your next tattoo, observe the practices in your chosen studio. If plastic wrap bandaging is one of them, seek another tattooer who cares to educate themselves on proper procedure. Think - if they don’t have bandaging correct, what other errors in procedure are they committing?

    Peggy Sucher
    Skin Deep Tattoo Waikiki
    Security Director, National Tattoo Assn
    Member, Alliance of Professional Tattooists

    hope this helps,
    mikey

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    westoflondon said on February 13, 2011

    I got a sleeve done 36hours ago and I was told to keep it covered with cling film for one week (changing it 2-3 times a day) with a thick layer of Bepanthen under it, and to use the Bepanthen for two weeks.
    I dont like the sound of this because it was very sweaty under the cling film, so I kept it wrapped up for 9 hours then removed it and im not going to use the cling film again.
    I had to sign a disclaimer before the tattoo was done saying the parlour would not be responsible if I did not follow their aftercare. I was only told the aftercare when the tattoo was finished!
    Anyway..over the last 24hours my arm has healed very well and is no longer sore. I will continue to use Bepanthen, for 7-10 days depending how it goes. I will apply 2-3 times a day and keep it thin because I dont want any colour loss, the tattoo is black and I dont want it fading to grey or blue.
    Its a shame there is no 'standard procedure' for large tattoo aftercare, as everyone I speak to says something slightly different.

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    donthommo said on February 15, 2011

    The linework on my sleeve I kept covered in cling film for 4-5hrs before removing and cleaning. Then I just cleaned it a couple times a day carefully with warm soapy water, and put a bit of bepanthen on it once it was 2-3 days old and a little scabby/peely.

    For the shading I did similar process, but kept the cling film on overnight before removing.

    All at the artists suggestion, and has all healed up like an absolute dream so far, can't knock it.

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    mattharnett said on February 15, 2011

    There's no way I would wear cling wrap for more than about 30 mins. There are bandages made for covering wounds.. I wear the "bandage" for about an hour then wash it and lightly coat it with tattoo salve. Then wash it, then salve it. That's about it.
    My artist recently got a tattoo on his wrist. While tattooing a client, he used the cling wrap under his shirt sleeve and gloves in order to prevent any of his fluids getting near the client and visa versa. If you really need a barrier, then by all means wear the saran wrap. If you just want it to heal, wash it and salve it (I use Annointed tattoo balm.).

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    luvtats said on February 18, 2011

    Does anyone know where i can find a Maori tribal design?, i love the ideas of stars,triangles, different shapes, typical maori designs, about an inch or so thick/wide!. I'm looking at geeting it on my left arm just below the elbow, i don't like the 'traditional' or 'normal' arm bands, Just can't seem to find anything i like or decent on the web! please help!
    Thanks

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    bigislander72 said on April 28, 2011

    Burns that require emergency treatment are extremely sensitive to bacterial infection. So what does ACEP(American Society of Emergency Physicians) recommend as a bandage for the hours that may pass before one can get treated at the ER? Ordinary household plastic wrap. Read the article here:

    http://www.acep.org/content.aspx?id=40462

    The article even goes into depth as to why cling wrap is essentially sterile and safe to use, as long as freshly unwrapped plastic is used. I don't know why an organization of medical professionals would recommend cling wrap as a biologically safe wound dressing for burns if it is a such hazard as its made out to be by some mis-informed gaurdian of the tattoo industry. I think I will go with a medical professional's opinion over Peggy Sucher's.

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    london96 said on April 28, 2011

    Been cling rapping my tatts since tatt number 1 and 18 years it hasnt failed me. I think the point of using the wrap is to get home and take it off and use ointment....using cling wrap for 4 days is just being silly and asking for investation

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    daddybearcat said on May 1, 2011

    Just dont wrap it around your head ! Btw I would never use it !

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    mariocliv said on May 1, 2011

    Just rub some dirt on it!

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    jsgoodwin said on May 4, 2011

    I get saran wrapped after each tattoo sitting, keep it on for 4 hours, remove it, clean the tattoo, then just leave the arm alone for a week. Simple as that, works fine. No ointment or lotion.

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    popeyethesailor said on May 17, 2011

    westoflondon said:
    I got a sleeve done 36hours ago and I was told to keep it covered with cling film for one week (changing it 2-3 times a day) with a thick layer of Bepanthen under it, and to use the Bepanthen for two weeks.
    I dont like the sound of this because it was very sweaty under the cling film, so I kept it wrapped up for 9 hours then removed it and im not going to use the cling film again.
    I had to sign a disclaimer before the tattoo was done saying the parlour would not be responsible if I did not follow their aftercare. I was only told the aftercare when the tattoo was finished!
    Anyway..over the last 24hours my arm has healed very well and is no longer sore. I will continue to use Bepanthen, for 7-10 days depending how it goes. I will apply 2-3 times a day and keep it thin because I dont want any colour loss, the tattoo is black and I dont want it fading to grey or blue.
    Its a shame there is no 'standard procedure' for large tattoo aftercare, as everyone I speak to says something slightly different.

    I don't like this either, think you did the right thing.

    the advice I am given is that in principle the act of tattooing wounds the skin, so your tattoo needs to be treated like a cut or graze

    1-2 hrs after being tattoed, remove the dressing/clingfilm etc and wash in warm water and antibacterial soap to remove any blood, which is what produces scabs.

    Simply cover your tattoo with clothing, keep clean, apply cream (bepanthen) 2-3 X daily until healed

    DON'TS

    rub your tattoo while healing - dab dry with towel
    Swim or bathe
    Expose to sun - sunburn + unhealed tattoo = OUCH!
    Use excessive cream as this can dissolve scabs and cause ink to come out
    Scratch if itchy or pick at scabs

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